Blizzard! The 1888 Whiteout

Jacqueline A. Ball

Blizzard! The 1888 Whiteout

Bearport Publishing Company, Inc. 2005

Elementary mid to upper

32 pages

Non fiction

Summary:

Blizzards must meet certain criteria, like blwing 35 miles per hour, and you cannot be able to see 500 feet in front of you. The temperature will be under 20 degrees farenheit, and these conditions will last at least three hours. The most famous blizzard in America was the Blizzard of 1888. This hurricane hit New York City. The wind chill factor will be such that it freezes peoples faces in less than a minute. The meteorology in the day wasn’t very accurate. It was transmitted by phone or telegraph and the particular forecast called for colder but generally fair. Two storm systems were headed towards the coast, one warm and one cold, but they didn’t see it hitting like it did. All of the Northern East coast was affected by the Blizzard of 1888. The children were safe at home due to snow cancellations, but many adults got caught off guard by the storm. People survived if they had food and fuel supplies on hand. The storm killed a total of 400 people. They made safety changes in the cities to save them from future disasters. We now have a better idea of when a large storm might come.

Your Reaction: It is eye opening to see how a storm can form quickly without any notice, but it’s comforting to know that we now can prevent a lot of the problems through preparation.

Potential Problems: Scary storms and death.

Recommendations: Those students interested in science and weather or history.

 

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